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Use this form to configure the LDAP protocol and to set up Internet aliases. You do not have to modify these settings unless you have an unusual Internet setup.



LDAP tab
Use this tab to configure the LDAP protocol.


LDAP port
The port to which LDAP users will connect. Do not change this port number unless advised to do so by your LAN administrator. The default is 389.
LDAP timeout
The time, in minutes, the server will wait for an LDAP request before disconnecting the remote user. The default is 1 minute.
Country
The ISO code for your country.
Organization
The name of your organization.
Organizational unit
A name describing the members of your organization who use this server (for example, Administration).

SSL


Status
The settings for SSL connections on your site for the LDAP protocol. For more information, see Adding SSL certificates to your site
Disabled
The default setting, SSL is disabled
Required
Allows only secure logins
Enabled
Allows both secure and nonsecure logins
Certificate name
The name of the SSL certificate in the Certificates folder
Port
The SSL port number. Default: 943.

Multiple email alias handling


When an LDAP client requests email aliases
The methods of returning multiple email aliases on LDAP client requests
1. Return multiple mail attribute/value pairs
Different applications require that multiple email aliases be returned different ways. One of these three methods should work for any application. If none of these work, the application probably has trouble working with multiple aliases.
2. Return a single mail attribute with multiple values
(Default)
3. Return one mail a/v pair, one 'other' attribute with multiple values
If choice 3, then use this name for the 'other' attribute
Use the default (othermail) for this name to be compatible with what Microsoft Address Book uses.


Aliases tab
Use this tab to indicate users' inbound mail aliases.


Space character
The ASCII character you want to substitute for a space in a user name when translating it into an Internet address. For example, the FirstClass user name Roy Allen is unacceptable as an Internet address because of the space. If you choose _ as the space character, Roy's internet address will be Roy_Allen@firstclass.com.
You can also define an Internet mail alias on a User Information Form. In that case, the alias will be used and the space character substitution ignored.

Automatic aliases


Select one of the options below to set FirstClass generation of automatic aliases.
81203_42521_14.png        Note
The Automatic aliases and Inbound mail addressing settings affect each other. For an explanation of how to configure these settings, see Configuring user mail aliases
Do not create automatic aliases
Default. Only the users' first and last names will be used (firstname_lastname@yoursite.com)
Use user IDs as aliases
The aliases are the same as the users' user ID. This guarantees unique aliases, but exposes FirstClass user IDs and therefore reduces the security of your system.
Use first initial and last name as aliases
The aliases consist of the first character of the first name plus the last name (for example James Lee Brown would have the alias jbrown). This is not guaranteed to be unique. Because internet aliases must be unique, you will have to check for duplicates on your system.
Use initials and last names as aliases
The aliases consist of the first character of the first name plus the first character of the middle name plus the last name (for example, James Lee Brown would have the alias jlbrown). This is not guaranteed to be unique. Because internet aliases must be unique, you will have to check for duplicates on your system.
Use first name and last initial as aliases
The aliases consist of the first name plus the first character of the last name (for example, James Lee Brown would have the alias jamesb). This is not guaranteed to be unique. Because internet aliases must be unique, you will have to check for duplicates on your system.
Use first and last names as aliases
The aliases consist of the first name plus the last name (for example, James Lee Brown would have the alias jamesbrown). This is not guaranteed to be unique. Because internet aliases must be unique, you will have to check for duplicates on your system.
Use last and first names as aliases
The aliases consist of the last name plus the first name (for example, James Lee Brown would have the alias brownjames). This is not guaranteed to be unique. Because internet aliases must be unique, you will have to check for duplicates on your system.
Use first initial and client ID as aliases
The aliases consist of the first character of the first name plus the client ID (for example, James Lee Brown with a client ID of 1289 would have the alias j1289). This guarantees unique aliases and doesn't expose your FirstClass user ID.
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You can override the Internet alias generated for a user by updating "Mail aliases" on the User Information Form (UIF) for that user.


Inbound mail addressing
Sets the level of matching on your system in conjunction with your choice of automatic aliases
Allow short forms
Least recommended. Allows, for example, ro_al@huskyplanes.com for Roy Allen
Exact match only
Requires the recipient's name to match the entire entry in the "Mail aliases" field on a User Information Form (for example, roy_allen@huskyplanes.com or roy@huskyplanes.com). This selection will also match a user's firstname_lastname entry in the Directory.
Aliases only
Most recommended. Allows only exact matches to the aliases set on a User Information Form.